Native looking Netbeans on Linux

It’s all very fine and well those Windows people having a nice native Look & Feel under Netbeans, but what about us lowly Linux types? Well as many already know, Sun implemented a GTK Look & Feel around the 1.5 release, but the Metal Look & Feel is still the default on a Linux system, even at 1.6. The new GTK Look & Feel actually uses GTK widgets underneath, so will emulate the GTK Look & Feel very closely (although I’ve come across a few minor issues with scrollbars).

So how do you invoke Netbeans with the GTK Look & Feel? It’s documented in the Netbeans documentation:

Instead of simply invoking the /bin/netbeans executable, invoke:

/opt/netbeans/bin/netbeans -laf com.sun.java.swing.plaf.gtk.GTKLookAndFeel

Substitue /opt/netbeans for wherever you installed Netbeans to.

Hint: You can open your “/opt/netbeans/etc/netbeans.conf” file, and add the “-laf com.sun.java.swing.plaf.gtk.GTKLookAndFeel” to the end of the “netbeans_default_options” variable.

This is all very fine and well for GNOME people, but what about the KDE users out there? The answer comes in the form of the QT Engine for GTK. It makes GTK applications use QT for their rendering (installed by default in SUSE).

nebeans-serenity.jpg Finally, heres a screen shot of Netbeans running with the Serenity Look & Feel (under KDE). I know it doesn’t look great, but it illustrates the idea anyway 😉 Click the image for the full view.

Advertisement

EoD SQL 0.9-beta Released

Due to a lot of work having come my way recently, I’ve decided to do another EoD SQL Beta release instead of going directly to 1.0. Several known bugs have been fixed in this release, and generally things are working much better than they used to. Here are some of the highlights of this release:

  • Queries are now pre-validated instead of lazy-validated
  • More detailed error messages
  • Query Strings are sanity checked during validation
  • @SelectPrimitive works as expected and can now handle Collections of primitives
  • JDBC 4 Query Strings (“?1, ?2” instead of “?{1} ?{2}”) work again
  • java.sql.Date, Time, and Timestamp are now known primitive types

There is still a bit of cleanup work to do, but this release should be a lot easier to work with, and a lot more stable.

Enjoy 😉